Aosom 26″ Rear Wheel 48V 1000W Electric Battery Powered Bicycle Motor Conversion Kit

June 8, 2017 - Comment

Have you ever thought about turning your bicycle into a pedal-wielding motorcycle? With our electric motor conversion kit, that’s exactly what you can do. Our conversion kit allows you to attach an electric powered motor to your bike, using our own back wheel designed specifically to be used with the motor. Fitting most 26″ tire

Buy Now! $219.99Amazon.com Price
(as of April 19, 2020 9:14 AM UTC - Details)

Have you ever thought about turning your bicycle into a pedal-wielding motorcycle? With our electric motor conversion kit, that’s exactly what you can do. Our conversion kit allows you to attach an electric powered motor to your bike, using our own back wheel designed specifically to be used with the motor. Fitting most 26″ tire slots, you utilize it along with the motor and an electric controller to go up to 28 mph on your bicycle. Everything that you need for the change comes inside our kit (except battery, battery charger and disc brake), including the new back wheel, the controller, 48v motor, and brake controllers that are meant to give control at those high speeds. With a quick and easy conversion process, you do not need to be a professional to attach the kit. Since it is easy to take on and off, you can alternate between biking positions, and the chargeable battery allows you to “go green.”

Features:
– Easily convert your pedal bike into a motorized bike
– Max speed of 28 mph
– Comes with 26″ rear wheel
– Two hand brakes to help stop the motor
– Pedal sensor to help power the motor
– Disc brake compatible with 140mm to 160mm brakes (Disc brake NOT included)

Specifications:
– Wheel Size: 26″
– Top Speed: 28 MPH
– Motor: 48V 1000W
– Amps: 20.83
– Net Weight: 28.7lb
– Requires: 48V Li, Lead-Acid, NiMH Battery

Includes:
– 48V 1000W brushless hub motor
– 26″ rear wheel
– Electric controller
– Thumb throttle
– Two hand brakes
– Pedal sensor
– Battery carrying bag with harness
– Instruction manual

NOTE: Battery and charger NOT included with this conversion kit

Product Features

  • Easily convert your pedal bike into a motorized bike
  • Max speed of 28 mph
  • Comes with 26″ rear wheel
  • Uses a 48V 1000W brushless hub motor
  • Two hand brakes to help stop the motor

Comments

Joseph Dean says:

25 MPH No Pedaling I got a Wal Mart bike to do my conversion. I wired 4 12 volt 10 amp hour SLA batteries in series using 12 gauge wire. I put in a 30 amp blade type fuse. I had to carefully file the rear drop outs from 10 mm for the axle to fit. I then installed a Grinn torque arm for extra sturdiness to keep the torque from spinning the axle out. I weigh 250 pounds with 25 pounds of SLA batteries. With no pedaling on flat road I got 25 mph with this kit. Have not tried range yet but will be doing that next. I got the SLA batteries for the cost just to make sure this would work and it seems to be working fine. I plan on getting a Lithium battery pack next. I worked a little each day on this over about a 2 week period to make sure I did it right the first time. For the first run of this everything is working as it should. This bike has V brakes and while it will stop you at 25 mph, you need to give yourself at least twice the stopping distance as opposed to having a bike with disc brakes…

Family Jewels says:

Fast hub motor for an ebike. This hub motor definitely works. The instructions are a joke, but if you know your way around bicycle mechanics and basic electrical theory, installation is pretty straightforward. Just match up the connections the way you would with any wiring harness. All you need is some 12 gauge wire, some batteries and the terminals to match them up. It is fast, maybe too fast, but I am working on the handling aspects of a very fast bicycle. You will need good brakes and you should be aware that 4 SLA batteries makes for a very top-heavy vehicle.I have no idea whether the motor is durable. I hope it lasts.Update: The cadence (pedal) sensor should vary speed/power with the speed of pedaling. Instead, the sensor appears to be little more than a switch. No pedaling – no power. Start pedaling and the motor jumps to full speed. In this way, the pedal assist is actually going to use up more power than throttle-only, since the pedal does not actually assist the motor except when…

Benedetto says:

HANG ON!!!

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